2019 Edible Perennials

Edible PerennialWith another year at Honeydew Headquarters in the West Kootenays under our belt, the food forest is starting to take shape…. and there is nothing quite like walking out the back door and choosing the freshest possible food for our meals….

Anyone can grow food! With just a little bit of space, it’s easy to grow many food producing plants that return every year. This year’s varieties are easy to grow, and most can be grown even in small gardens and urban settings.

2019′s Food Forest Collection includes:

Asparagus – Jersey Knight

Blackberry – NEW! Black Satin Thornless

Blueberry – Chandler, Bluecrop, Sweetheart

Cherry – Romeo, Juliet, Cupid, Valentine

Gooseberrry . . . → Read More: 2019 Edible Perennials

Lovage

lovageLovage (Levisticum officinale)

Height: 36 – 72″ / Spread: 18″ / Perennial to zone 2

I have to admit it, I love lovage. It’s a very hardy perennial, easily surviving in my zone 2b garden. Historically, it was a popular garden plant. It’s appearance in modern gardens is rare, and I do believe this should change. I love the fact that lovage is sun/part shade plant, as it happily sits in the background, living life to the fullest in all its stature, leaving more room for the super sun loving plants in the garden. It does not appear to be bothered by pests in the garden.

It will grow very tall . . . → Read More: Lovage

What's Your Canadian Hardiness Zone?

portulaca_breathSo, I found this really cool Canadian interactive hardiness zone map the other day. It says that here at Honeydew Gardens we are situated in a zone 2b.

It’s a Good News, Bad News sort of situation, considering that when we moved here almost six years ago, I believed we were a full zone colder, 1b. Nice to know.

But it really makes it hard to grow several of the perennials and trees that I would just love to have in the garden. I have to admit, we have several perennials in the garden, and the list gets larger each year. But still, there are so many lovely plants that just . . . → Read More: What’s Your Canadian Hardiness Zone?