2018 Edible Perennial Collection

2018 Edible Perennial Collection CardWe’re pretty jazzed about growing good food. Besides from the relaxing and mood boosting benefits, the obvious benefit of fresh, zero mile food is just too much to resist.

And with just a little bit of space, it’s easy to grow many food producing plants that return every year. This year’s varieties are easy to grow, and most can be grown even in small gardens and urban settings.

2018′s Food Forest Collection includes .

Asparagus – Jersey Knight

Blueberry – Razz, Sweetheart, Reka, Chandler

Cherry – Romeo, Juliet, Cupid, Valentine

Grapes – Canadice

Haskap – Tundra, Honey Bee

Kiwi – Issai (self pollinating)

Raspberry – Purple, Honeydew . . . → Read More: 2018 Edible Perennial Collection

This Year's Veggie Patch

pineapple mintSo another spring, another garden on it’s way….and it’s about time.  I’m ready. In fact, things are already really starting to grow around here. :-)

Garden plans have been laid, seedlings have been started and supplies are coming in!

How Exciting!

Probably one of my favorite winter tasks is planning the garden and picking out which seed varieties I will grow. I have a thing for variety. For surprise. For color. My biggest problem, really, is narrowing it down to the few selections that will end up in the greenhouse and in the gardens!

So, many plants, so little time. Right? So, in the . . . → Read More: This Year’s Garden Patch

Food Growing Summit 2014

harvest9aug11As many of you know, I’m a huge advocate of growing your own food, and/or supporting your local food producers. That’s why I was so excited when I learned about this upcoming event…

The Food Growing Summit 2014 is a free tele-summit taking place March 3-7, that has an amazing line-up of farmers, backyard food growers and food activists who have joined up to share loads of information and to inspire and guide you to grow food this spring. No experience necessary!

Please, click on this link to get more info and meet the co-ordinators of this awesome event! Be sure to check out the speakers’ schedule, as there are so . . . → Read More: Food Growing Summit 2014

2011 Garden Plan - Peas

Spring Peas…Mmmm :)

Peas like the cool temperatures of spring/early summer, and are easy to grow. And they reward us with delicious food that tastes good both raw and cooked. Peas have been loved by many dating back through the centuries, in fact archeological digs have found evidence of human consumption of peas dating back to earlier than 9000 BC!

If there is one veggie that doesn’t even make it out of the garden, it’s peas. We had to try really hard to get some to last it to the house last summer. Sadly, they were gone in a day.

So this year, I . . . → Read More: 2011 Garden Plan – Peas

2011 Garden Plan

Gardenus indecisionus.: a chronic condition, usually presenting in late winter and peaking in early spring yearly. It can cause insomnia, discomfort and anxiety. In severe conditions it can even cause nervousness and a need to constantly sort out seeds. Extreme symptoms include buying more seeds than the gardener has the space/time/energy/money for with delusional thoughts of a tropical oasis in their yard.

I’m sure I’m not the only gardener that suffers from this dreaded affliction. Right?

I was recently inspired to start cataloging seeds. It all started when I was trying to fill a trade order and couldn’t find the Taiyo Sunflower seeds I knew I had. I looked high, . . . → Read More: 2011 Garden Plan

A New Adventure in Local Farming

2011.

Wow..time flies!

It seems like we arrived in north central Saskatchewan only a short time ago. It was 12:05 am in early June 2008. Filled with wonder, excitement & expectation – exhausted after a 7 hour drive with all our worldly possessions – we collapsed into sleep for the night.

The next day, as planned, the garden plot was being scoped out. It had been a dry spring. The soil was dusty and parched. The vegetable seedlings that had been painstakingly raised and transported from our far away Alberta home would have to wait. Irrigation began.

Despite the late start that summer, we had a bumper crop of . . . → Read More: A New Adventure in Local Farming